Archive for the ‘ Dailies ’ Category

Sandoval in Boston

Pablo Sandoval arrived at Boston’s Logan Airport on Monday afternoon for a recruiting visit with the Red Sox, who will be one of his main suitors in free agency. It had been reported that Sandoval would be coming to Boston this week, and a local television affiliate, Channel 7, got exclusive video footage of him upon arrival.

It is still very early in the free-agent process for Sandoval, who is expected to meet with several teams. It won’t truly be known what shape Sandoval’s negotiations will take until he meets with the San Francisco Giants, the team the third baseman has won three World Series championships with in the last five years.

The Giants have stated they would like to meet with Sandoval later in the process, after he has met with other teams.

Sandoval could help give the Red Sox the type of production they badly need from the left side of the plate. Aside from David Ortiz, Boston’s lineup is almost all right-handed. Sandoval is a switch hitter, but is stronger from the left side. The Red Sox also haven’t had much production at third base the last two seasons, and Sandoval could certainly change that.

Sandoval, who is 28 years old, could be seeking a contract of five or six years.

He has spent his entire career with the Giants, hitting .294 with 106 homers, 462 RBIs and an .811 OPS.

Jeter’s final stop — Boston

Derek Jeter was emotionally drained from his Yankee Stadium finale, and asked out of Friday night’s lineup at Fenway. He indicated he will DH in the final two games, on Saturday and Sunday.

But the captain did hold a lengthy press conference. Here are some of the highlights.

Thoughts on Fenway as a final destination? “To finish up my season, if there’s anywhere to play besides New York, I guess it’s only fitting that it’s here in Boston because of all the games that I’ve played here, the rivalry between the Red Sox and Yankees. If you can’t do it in New York, this is the next-best place, I guess.”

Will it be hard to recharge for the weekend?  “Probably. I don’t know; I’m not playing tonight. I don’t know if I could play tonight if I anted to play tonight. I’m sure it will. Last night was as special as it gets. Playing your last game at home at Yankee Stadium, the way the fans were, the atmosphere; it was supposed to rain and people didn’t think we were going to play, and I don’t even think there was a raindrop the whole night. Everything was pretty much perfect in terms of the situation we were in for my last game.”

Remembrances of the rivalry: “This rivalry has been intense throughout the years. It doesn’t get any more intense than playing in the ALCS in back-to-back years. For the most part, for most of my career, the two teams have been 1-2 in the division and we’ve been fighting for first place. The teams have been pretty evenly matched. They’ve won a few World Series and we’ve won a few, but just the electricity, the atmosphere, the excitement – the fans are what make the atmosphere fun for us. It’s always been fun to come here and when they come to New York, it always seems like it’s almost like a postseason game. We play them so many times, but the atmosphere seems like a postseason game.”

Which Red Sox players will you remember the most?  “There’s a lot. There’s a few guys that I’ve played against. I’ve been coming here for a long, long time. There’s guys you play against, there’s pitchers that you’ve faced whether it’s Pedro, Schilling or Wakefield. These are guys we had some battles against. I’ve enjoyed it. I’ve always enjoyed competing against the best and Boston, their teams have been some of the best that we’ve played during my career. I come here time after tie and enjoyed the games. They seemed like they were draining every time we came here and when they came to New York, but there were so many people we played against throughout the course of the years where when I look back and reflect on it, I’ll be happy I had a chance to compete against those guys.”

 Interaction with people in Boston? “I went to lunch. I was outside a little bit. People were just saying congratulations on the career and that I’m a Red Sox fan, I hate the Yankees but I respect you. It was brief. I wasn’t outside much because I hadn’t slept much. I tried to stay in. When I was walking here through the stands, there were fans cheering, which was kind of different. I remember coming here in the All-Star Game in ’99 and the car that was dropping us off went to the wrong entrance. I was out of the car walking to the stadium and I thought they were going to kill me, they were all over me. So it’s funny how things have changed.”

Red Sox fans nicer to you now? “I think after they won, it sort of – I don’t want to say they softened up, so don’t say they softened up, but I think they’ve become a little bit kinder. And thank you for that.”

Can this weekend be as emotional as the farewell in New York? “I don’t know. I can’t imagine it being like it was in New York, and that has nothing to do with where I am, that’s just where I;ve played my entire career. I know, it’s another I don’t know, I can tell you on Sunday, but I can; t imagine it, because that’s pretty much as good as it gets, I think for me. Like I said, I’m playing here because I have respect for this rivalry, for Boston, and the fans. If it was anywhere else I don’t know if I’d play.”

Even Ortiz cheered for you last night: “That’s probably the first time he’s ever cheered for me to get a hit, I think. But it’s always good to hear it. I’ve heard so many great things from peers throughout the course of the season, whether it’s the younger guys or some of the older guys. You have a mutual; respct for guys you compete against year in and year out. David’s been here for a long time. He’s been a big part of this rivalry. These are the games you’re going to miss when you retire but when you have guys that say things like that it makes you feel good.”

How do you envision your final at-bat at Fenway? “I don’t know. I don’t try to script things. I have no idea.”

 

John Lackey spoke to the Boston media prior to Tuesday’s Red Sox-Cardinals game, just days after being traded by the team he won the World Series with to the team he beat in the clinching game.

Reuniting with old teammates:  “Oh yeah absolutely. it’s great to see some friends, for sure. Talked to a couple of them yesterday on the phone and stuff. definitely some guys you’ll miss but kind of part of the deal.”

Going to the Cardinals: “Pretty excited, actually. I wasn’t really surprised. Honestly, it was about as good a place for me to be right now. I was pretty happy with where it happened, I guess.”

The way the Red Sox were dismantling last year’s team, maybe it was best he left? “I mean, yeah, you could see it kind of heading in that direction for sure. I’m happy to be here and happy with what happened and the way Ben handled it was first class so everything was cool.”

Chance to get back to the World Series: “That’s the only reason I’m still playing. I’m still playing to try to win a ring. That’s the only reason I’m still here. to be able to be here and have that opportunity to make a playoff run or try to get into the playoffs is where I want to be.”

Three rings for three teams? “That’s getting a little bit too far ahead of ourselves. Let’s see how I do in my next start.”

Any talks with Red Sox about an extension before you left?  “No, not … not really. We didn’t get that far ahead.”

Why not? “I’m glad to be here.”

Was Lackey hoping for a trade?  “I’m not going to go that far. I wasn’t surprised.”

Your time in Boston:   “There were definitely some ups and downs, for sure, some fun and some not so fun, I guess.”

What will you remember most? “I’ll concentrate on last year and winning a championship and really enjoying that year and having fun with those guys.”

Were the tough times he had in Boston toughest of his career? “I’ve moved on.”

Glad he didn’t have to pitch in this series against Boston? “I would have been OK pitching against the Red Sox, yeah. Yeah.”

But five or six days after the trade? “That would have been a little crazy, for sure, for it to be that quick. I’m going to concentrate on getting outs and I would have gone on and done my thing.”

Boston Globe columnist  Dan Shaughnessy tells Lackey he doesn’t seem very sentimental about Boston: “I mean, I don’t know what you want me to say.”

 Talk to Lester much lately? “Oh yeah. We talked every other day at least. We’ve already talked a little trash. Hopefully I’ll see him later on.”

How about a chance to face Lester in the World Series? “That’s what we talked about, yeah. Hopefully it works out, we’ll see.”

You said you have no problem pitching for the player minimum next year with Cardinals. Would you have done that for Boston?  “I don’t know about that honestly. I didn’t get that far ahead to think about it at that point.”

 What is different about doing that in St. Louis vs. Boston?  “You guys are trying to stir stuff up. I didn’t get that far ahead thinking about it.”

Victorino to seek second opinion; could need back surgery

Shane Victorino cringed when he saw the results of an MRI on his back, and will go see specialist Dr. Robert Watkins in Los Angeles hoping he can avoid surgery.

At this point however, surgery seems like a legitimate option, if not a likely one, and Victorino has probably played his last baseball game in 2014.

“I’m definitely disappointed, news that I didn’t want to get,” Victorino said. “Obviously I think we need another opinion, see where we’re at and we’re going to go from there.””

Victorino didn’t disclose what the MRI showed.  “I’m not a doctor. Obviously this showed some signs of some things going on with my back that obviously it’s important for us to get a second opinion. We’ll go and see what happens and go from there,” Victorino said.

The right fielder is curious to see if Watkins agrees what the findings of the Red Sox medical staff.  “Yeah, that’s why I’m going to go get that second opinion just to see what he might have since he’s what they call and consider a back specialist. But any time you have to go and see someone like that, it’s never what you want to hear. You’re just hoping that what you see in an MRI doesn’t come out with that kind of information. We’ll get that second opinion and see how it goes.”

“That’s more of the reason. you want to know what’s going on and what’s happening but as I’ve said, any time you get news that you don’t want to hear, you obviously want to see what’s going to happen. as I said, I’m going to go out to LA and see what’s being said. For me, it’s never good, but it’s all part of it. I tried to play through it, I try to do the best I can. the training staff did the best we could to try to get me back out there but things are showing that there might be some things that, as I said, we didn’t want to see. We’ll go from there.”

“I don’t want to talk about what we discussed. I think that, as I said, it wasn’t the news that we wanted. Some of the things that were shown were a little bit more than what we had hoped for, at least I had hoped for. But obviously being out there and not being able to go and having those things hamper me, I knew something was wrong. I don’t mind playing through pain, I don’t mind playing through an injury. But the continuation of it happening was the thing that was worrisome to me. the other night when I felt it, it was something that kind of woke me up a little bit. It was kind of sharp and sudden when it happened and we obviously found out why, with what the MRI revealed. To go get another opinion from Dr. Watkins and see what he has is important to me to get that view of things and we kind of have an idea of what’s going to happen. as I said, I hope it’s not going to be as serious. That’s what I’m hoping.”

At the July 31 trade deadline, the Red Sox acquired two outfielders — Yoenis Cespedes and Allen Craig. With Victorino out, Cespedes will transition to right field (though he started in left on Saturday) and Craig will play left.

Lester’s thoughts after arriving in Oakland

Jon Lester spoke to the media upon his arrival in Oakland today.

Here are the highlights, courtesy of my MLB.com teammate extraordinaire Ms. Jane Lee.

Relationship with the Red Sox: “Any time you negotiate with a team and it doesn’t go the way everyone wants it, there’s always a little bit of disappointment, but that’s not to say the effort wasn’t there on both sides to get something done. But my time in Boston will be something I always remember and cherish, from 2002 to yesterday. I’ve got nothing but great things to say about the organization, the way they treated me, treated my family through the good times and bad times. We’ll see where that relationship goes later on, but right now I’m an A and I’m going to go out and perform for these guys and do the best I can to bring the championship here.”

The last last few days: “The anxiety of it, not knowing where you’re going to be … having a family makes it difficult. When you leave someplace you call home for eight years, that made it harder. But, like I said, I’m happy to be here and happy to be a part of this, and hopefully I can contribute.”

 Going from Fenway to the Coliseum: “Obviously having the Monster 300 feet away isn’t exactly great for pitching, but it’s a lot more foul territory, bigger in gaps, it’s going to be fun to see what those doubles that scrape the wall are fly balls to left. It’ll be nice to see that instead of the cheap doubles. We’ll see. I’ll just pitch my style and see what happens.”

Familiarity with pitching coach Curt Young: “Huge. That’ll definitely make the transition a little bit easier. You go through a lot of ups and downs, a lot of trials and errors, stuff you get into in bullpens, during a game, and he knows how I am as a competitor and a person. That makes a transition for me as a pitcher, and our catchers, defense, a little bit easier. You don’t have to learn someone all over again. He knows that from a full season, so it’ll make it a lot easier on me and hopefully on the team.”

After sleepless night, Cherington completes eventful day

So, how much sleep did Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington get on Trade Deadline eve?

“Didn’t [sleep] last night and maybe not much the previous couple nights,” Cherington said. “A lot of coffee and other stuff. We had to see what we could do and try to take advantage of the unfortunate position we’re in. Hopefully we were able to do some things that give us a headstart on that.”

The first domino fell between 3 and 4 a.m. Thursday, when Cherington and Billy Beane created a rare blockbuster of All-Star Players. Jon Lester, along with Jonny Gomes, went to the A’s. Yoenis Cespedes, who could give the parking lot behind the Green Monster a workout, comes to the Red Sox.

“I don’t know if I’m going to get the time exactly right — but we had an agreement in principle on like the structure, it was probably between 3-4 this morning,” Cherington said. “And then, you know, you’ve got to get through medicals and Major League approval and all of that stuff, so it doesn’t get really official until later. So sometime in the middle of the night.”

Then, there was the deal that sent John Lackey to the Cardinals for Allen Craig and Joe Kelly. Then, the one that sent Andrew Miller to the Orioles for lefty prospect Eduardo Rodriguez. And finally, the one that sent shortstop Stephen Drew to the Yankees for Kelly Johnson.

Cherington put his battle plan in motion about a week ago, when the Red Sox went through yet another slide that took away the momentum of winning eight of nine.

“We’ve made a series of trades today that we believe give us a good head start on building again and hopefully building towards a very good team as quickly as possible,” Cherington said. “Our intent going into today and really this week was just, given where we were, given where the team was in the standings and given the math that we’re fighting coming into this week, our intent was to try to see what opportunities are out there for us. There was a lot of interest in our players and we wanted to see if there were opportunities to turn that into moves that like, I said, could give us a head start on building again and becoming better as quickly as we can. That was our general sort of guiding philosophy this week and hopefully we turned it into some moves that make us better now and give us a real head start the rest of the season and going into the offseason with the full intent of building a strong contending team for 2015.”

It was a collaborative effort, as Cherington and much of his staff worked into the wee hours of Thursday to re-shape the roster.

“We had a group of 15 or so of us that were sort of consistently in the room, and that’s a combination of front office folks and scouts and ownership’s in and out,” Cherington said. “Roughly 15, and then that gets bigger, gets smaller sometimes. It gets a little smaller by 4 in the morning. But yeah, you know, we were here the whole time.”

That’s been the case for the last week or so.

“Long days and long nights. As everyone knows, you all know, for every trade you do make, there’s 20 or 30 other iterations that don’t come together. Even for the ones you do make, especially bigger ones, and some of these are bigger ones, those require a lot of phone calls, a lot of work from a lot of different people. We haven’t slept much the last three or four days,” Cherington said. “You can probably tell. But we knew coming into this week that we had a job to do: We had to find a way to take advantage of the unfortunate position that we’re in and try to kickstart a little bit building the next team. So that’s what we try to do. It was a great team effort from a lot of people, including ownership, but certainly baseball operations, and John Farrell is involved. We worked around the clock, literally.”

“I think I’m proud of the group that I work with because it’s a group that literally worked around the clock for about 4-5 days to try to do this. And again, time will tell what the results are, but I’m proud of the people I work with for how hard they worked. They were prepared and ready and, you know, everything we needed to give ourselves a chance to make decisions was there thanks to the people that I work with. As far as challenging, I just think this year has been challenging. Use any word you want. It’s been frustrating, disappointing, hard to explain at times, and certainly as I said before, I take responsibility for where we are. So I think the year, it’s not the last two days, it’s the whole year’s been challenging. We’ve got to get better. We know that.”

Thursday might have been the first step back to contention for 2015 and beyond.

Bogaerts going through rut

There have been extremes with Xander Bogaerts during his rookie season. For a considerable part of May, Bogaerts was the hottest hitter on the Red Sox. That has not been the case of late, as he has struggled mightily.

With the addition of Mookie Betts creating somewhat of a log jam — five players competing for four positions — Bogaerts was the odd man out for Sunday’s game against the Yankees.

Brock Holt played third base, with an outfield of Daniel Nava, Jackie Bradley Jr. and Betts.

Over his last 80 at-bats, Bogaerts has nine hits for an average of .113 with one homer ,three RBIs, a .153 OBP and a .163 slugging percentage.

“Those adjustments are in the works,” said Red Sox manager John Farrell. “His timing is off. We recognize that. There are some things that are tangibly different right now than when he was in a stretch where he was impacting the baseball with regularity. That is being addressed in early work, it’s being addressed in regular BP and while it’s being accomplished more readily at that speed, game speed is where some of that reverting back is taking place. It’s not about talent or commitment to work it’s the execution at game speed. We’ve got to remain patient, keep working at it and that’s what we’re doing.”

Farrell doesn’t think it’s a matter of teams changing  their approach. “I wouldn’t say pitched differently. Again, we were able to identify through video and a subjective view from the dugout so these were things that were being talked about with him, shown on video and we’ll continue to work through.”

Ortiz apologizes to MLB, Torre, scorer for gripe

First things first. Official scorer Bob Ellis changed his call from last Wednesday’s Red Sox-Twins game at Fenway Park, crediting David Ortiz with a hit on a ball first baseman Joe Mauer bobbled on a half-dive.

Ortiz gave a thumbs down sign up to the press box during the game and was critical of Ellis following the game. But on Monday, Ortiz admitted the way he expressed his frustration was wrong.

“All I have to say is I know I owe an apology to MLB, Mr. Joe Torre, even the scorekeeping guys,” said Ortiz. “I know that I had frustration come out that way, and that’s not what you really want. You don’t want things to be like that and everything.”

Ortiz admitted that the way things have gone for him this season — he was hitting .248 entering Monday’s game — probably played a role in his actions.

“This has been a season already that has been jam-packed with frustration. At the end of the day, our job is based on results. I sit down and watch that TV every night after the game and I go 0-for-4, and all people talk and [complain] about is why I’m not hitting .300. of course, you don’t want to get caught into a situation … we are a family that of course needs to protect each other. The whole week has been about me protecting over a hit. There’s a lot of people mad at me because I argued something that I didn’t think I should get. I don’t blame them. I’m not apologizing just because I got that result. It’s because the message was spread out based on frustration. That’s why I’m apologizing.”

“Like I say man, it’s just something, I didn’t want the message to come out that way but it already happened and there’s nothing you can do about it.”

When someone mentioned to Ortiz that he wound up being right that the call should have been ruled a hit, he said, “Well, let’s keep it classy.”

Pedro to Sox fans: Cheer Manny next week

When the 2004 Red Sox have their 10-year reunion at Fenway Park next week, there should be great memories of the characters that helped break an 86-year World Series championship drought.

Amid a festive atmosphere, Pedro Martinez hopes that Red Sox fans rise to the occasion and give Manny Ramirez a warm welcome in his first visit to Fenway Park since 2010.

“It took a lot for him to come,” said Martinez. “He wants to make it up to the Boston fans. He wants to show everybody that he’s a different person, that he’s a Christian man and a role model to his family. His kids are going to be here. It will be nice if we all kind of get together and just make a fun day out of it and remember that Manny was the MVP [of the World Series] and he’s the biggest reason probably why we won it.”

The ceremony will take place prior to the May 28 home game against the Braves.

When the Red Sox signed Ramirez to an eight-year contract in December 2000, Martinez was one of the players who helped recruit him.

Fittingly, Martinez also was one of the key people to encourage Ramirez to come back to Boston for a reunion in which nearly every core member of the “Idiots” will be on hand.

“Yeah, I tried to talk him into it,” Martinez said. “He wants to make up with Boston again.”

There were many highs and lows for Ramirez in Boston, but nobody can dispute he is one of the best hitters in club history.

In eight seasons with the Sox, Ramirez was a .312 hitter with 274 homers and a .999 OPS.

Ramirez was traded for Jason Bay in 2008 after several incidents, including a dugout skirmish with Kevin Youkilis and an altercation in which he pushed traveling secretary Jack McCormick to the ground.

After his departure from the Red Sox, Ramirez was twice suspended for violation of MLB’s performing-enhancing drugs policy, the latter of which occurred during his brief stint for the Rays in 2011.

But Martinez can sense how regretful Ramirez is of those incidents.

“He made a couple of mistakes,” said Martinez. “He knows it, but now he knows he’s a different man. He’s a Christian man and all he wants to talk about is God.”

This will be the first time Ramirez has done anything in affiliation with the Red Sox since his controversial departure from the club.

“His kids, I’m pretty sure, are very excited to come over and see their dad again in Fenway,” Martinez said. “I think fans should take that in consideration.”

Pedroia back; Napoli out

As the Red Sox welcomed one key hitter back to the lineup in Dustin Pedroia, they lost another — at least for the night — in Mike Napoli.

Pedroia is leading off tonight, with Bogaerts hitting second and Gomes hitting fourth. Napoli dislocated his left ring finger on Tuesday night in a gruesome-looking head-first dive into second.

He is day-to-day.

Daniel Nava will play first base in Napoli’s absence tonight.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 85 other followers