Results tagged ‘ Hanley Ramirez ’

Hanley hits seventh for first time since rookie year

Amid his  quest to regain his  timing and production at the plate, Hanley Ramirez was moved down to the No. 7 spot in manager John Farrell’s batting order. It was the first time Ramirez has started a game in the No. 7 spot in the batting order since 2006. Chris Young was vaulted up to the No. 5 spot.

“Yeah, as we know, Hanley’s been working through some things to try to get timing on track,” said Farrell. “Bottom  line, the players are going to kind of tell you where they hit in the order. Chris has done an outstanding job this year, particularly against left-handed pitchers. And while Hanley works through the timing issues, we felt we needed a little jump start or a spark potentially.”

Ramirez thought he had found something a week ago when he hit a mammoth home run against Baltimore’s Kevin Gausman.

“Yeah, even it wasn’t a home run, you saw hard contact,” Farrell said. “Really, that’s kind of what you’re looking for when timing is a little more consistent or on the mark. The fact that it went out of the ballpark in my mind is somewhat irrelevant. He squared up a breaking ball that stayed up in the middle of the strike zone. As we’ve talked about, the leg kick, the timing, the bat path, that’s all being worked on.”

After a  monster first month with the Red Sox in 2015, Ramirez hasn’t hit for the type of production the Red Sox envisioned when they signed him to a four-year, $88-million contract. Since May 1, 2015, Ramirez has a line of .250/.303/.372 with 14 homer and 70 RBIs.

Farrell trying to pick spots for Ortiz

David Ortiz was out of the lineup on Tuesday night, marking his first day off since April 26, when he the Red Sox didn’t have the DH in Atlanta.

With the Red Sox facing lefty Sean Manaea, manager John Farrell felt it was a good time to give Ortiz a rest during  this stretch in which his  team plays 32 games in 33 days.

“As strong a start as he’s had, personally, I lose sight that he’s 40 years old,” said Farrell. “There are going to be periodic days for rest. I thought tonight was a matchup that, maybe our right-handers have a better matchup. David’s a good matchup against anyone. If you’re picking your spots, this is a day for David to be down.”

Brock Holt also got a rest, with Chris Young  playing left. Hanley Ramirez replaced Ortiz at DH, with Travis Shaw moving from third to first and  Josh Rutledge got the nod  at third.


Pablo, Rusney debut in Toronto

With a quick turnaround after last night’s thrilling victory, manager John Farrell made a couple of lineup changes for  Saturday afternoon’s matinee in Toronto.

Pablo Sandoval and Rusney Castillo, who are owed a combined $134.5 million for the balance of their contracts and are playing bench roles, are both in the lineup. Sandoval is at third, with Travis Shaw moving to first and Hanley Ramirez serving as the DH.  David Ortiz will get a rest. Castillo is in center, with Jackie Bradley out of the lineup.

“To get everybody on the field, get everybody involved in a ballgame on this first road trip,” said Farrell. “[R.A.] Dickey’s kind of an unusual matchup for us and I think there are certain types of swings that we have felt, over a course of time, that have played better against a knuckleballer. It’s an opportunity for Rusney to get into center field, put Panda on the field as well, who’s swung the bat in a limited number of bats but at least he’s swung the bat decently against Dickey. This keeps everybody involved.”

Chris Young, who is 1-for-13 lifetime against Dickey, is expected to make his first start of the season tomorrow.

Despite needing the bullpen for six innings on Friday, Farrell thinks he’ll have enough coverage on Saturday.

“Barnes will be available. We’re certainly covered, we’ve got the ability to match up if needed. We’re in decent shape,” Farrell said.

Hanley healthy, eyeing strong rebound

PUNTA CANA, Dominican Republic – With the soothing shores of his native island crashing in the background, a cheerful Hanley Ramirez spotted a small group of Red Sox reporters having lunch and sat down next to them for an update on his health and overall state of mind as he prepares to switch positions for the second straight season .

In Punta Cana this weekend for David Ortiz’s Celebrity Golf Classic, Ramirez was affable, and clearly in a better state of mind than a couple of months ago, when his ailing right shoulder ended his season early.

“Great,” said Ramirez. “I’ve been working out. I’ll stop for a little bit [this weekend] and then go back.”

Ramirez left the Red Sox late in the season to concentrate on shoulder rehab in Miami, and feels that plan worked perfectly.

“The thing is, it was a good thing they did, when they sent me home, like two weeks or a week and a half before the season ended,” Ramirez said. “After a couple of weeks, I was ready to go. I was feeling strong after two weeks.”

Ramirez first banged up his left shoulder running into the wall at the end of April, and then ran into trouble with the other shoulder in July or August. The result was an utter lack of offense over the season’s final months from a player who has hit throughout his entire career.

Ramirez thinks that his decline in production – which he felt was mainly related to injuries – led to overblown scrutiny about his physique.

“The thing is, in April, nobody said anything,” Ramirez said. “I had 10 homers. I know how it is. It’s the media.  When you’re struggling, things are going to come out. When you do good, I just got to hit and that’s it, and everything’s going to be fine.”

However, Ramirez said he will honor the request of president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski to get “more athletic”. He has altered his training routine this winter and the plan is for him to be about 230 pounds for 2016.

Ramirez admitted that he used to train like a football player in the winter, but noted he needs to adapt as he gets older.

“That’s what we’re doing this year,” Ramirez said. “We’re concentrating on the smaller muscles inside the different ones. It’s what the medical staff on the Red Sox want and it’s what we’ve been doing. I’ve been doing a lot of cardio and agility because to play the infield, that’s the difference.”

While Ramirez would like to play Winter Ball in the Dominican, he realizes the Red Sox might rather he keep focusing on his workouts and return to health.

“Every year I try to play to get ready. If they let me, I play,” Ramirez said. “If they don’t let me, I just keep working in the gym and doing my thing to get ready.”

Ramirez’s transition to left field didn’t go well at all last year, but he has confidence that playing first base won’t be nearly as difficult for him to master.

“I’ve been in the infield my whole life,” Ramirez said. “This is nothing new for me. Just work on my hands, relaxing my hands, and that’s it. We’re going to concentrate on footwork and all that stuff in maybe in like a week with the team I was supposed to play Winter League with and just go there and try to get some work done.”

Ramirez will arrive to Spring Training a couple of weeks early and feels he’ll have plenty of time to master the art of first base with renowned instructor Brian Butterfield.

“What we did last year, towards the end of the year, he gave me some keys, and I was like, ‘Wow, this works.’ You see it with [Mike] Napoli,” said Ramirez. “Napoli was a catcher and he moved to first. He picked it. Butterfield, man, he’s good.”

“The outfield is different. You can see Bradley, he’s unbelievable. Or Mookie, I wish I could do that. I was clapping every time they made a good play because I know myself, I couldn’t do it,” Ramirez said. “Going to the infield, it’s different, it’s way different. I’m an infielder. I don’t know why you guys think it’s going to be hard. I just have to keep working every day and no doubt I’ll make some mistakes but we just have to learn from that. At the end of the season, just win and everything is going to be alright.”

As for the speculation the Red Sox might try to trade Ramirez, he hasn’t heard any of that from Dombrowski. Ramirez very much once to fulfill the final three seasons of his contract in Boston.

“Why you think I cried when they traded me the first time when I was in Double-A? But the thing is, he’s honest,” Ramirez said of Dombrowski. “He tells you what we wants, and you respect people like that. That’s why I feel great right now. He told me what he wants me to do. We set up all the points, and I’m fine with that, he’s fine with that.”

Right shoulder latest thing hindering Hanley

BOSTON – Though Hanley Ramirez’s right shoulder ailment – the one that had him out of the lineup again on Monday night – didn’t become public knowledge until a few days ago, it has bothered him for several weeks.

And it perhaps explains why Ramirez has had such limited production since the All-Star break, a span in which he’s hit .183 with no homers, seven RBIs and a .449 OPS.

“I made one throw here at home,” said Ramirez. “I don’t remember what month it was. And I hurt something, but I played through it. And then it happened again last homestead here. Since then it wasn’t feeling right and I was playing through it.

“But it got to the point where I took it to the manager and the trainer and they understood and they didn’t want me to go out there if I wasn’t 100 percent. That’s what we’ve been dealing with right now. I’ve just been waiting to get back to Boston to get it checked out with a doctor.”

Ramirez was set to be examined prior to Monday night’s game against the Yankees, at which point the Red Sox will have a better read on how to proceed.

When Ramirez was out of action from Aug. 8-16, the club said it was due to discomfort from when he fouled a ball off his foot. Truth be told, Ramirez said, his shoulder was the main thing that was bothering him tat that time.

“But I didn’t say anything until the last game in Detroit [in early August]. This is not me,” Ramirez said. “I’m such a good hitter and I can’t look like that on the field. But I didn’t want to say anything because I wanted to play.”

The production didn’t improve when Ramirez came back from that hiatus. In fact, in an eight-game stretch, he hit .097 with no RBIs, after which the club held him out of the lineup for four straight games, including Monday.

Ramirez got off to a monster start at the plate this season, banging out 10 homers in April. But in his last game that month, he sprained his left shoulder while running into the wall. A few weeks after that, Ramirez was smoked by a line in the left hand.

“If you go back and think how this could happen, to get hit by a line-drive in that spot — ‘m a lower-hand hitter. My power comes from my left hand, not by top hand. It’s unbelievable,” said Ramirez.

Though Ramirez has been maligned by fans and media mainly for his defense this season, his lack of offense has probably hurt the Red Sox more. Ramirez can never remember a season in which so many different injuries piled up on him.

Until Monday, Ramirez never really spoke much about his injuries. Instead, he just played through them and took the criticism.

“They don’t know those little things. My teammates know and the team,” Ramirez said. “So that’s the difference. You can control what you can control. They don’t know what’s going on in here, what’s going on with my body. I respect that because they pay to see you prove every day that you’re there. They want us to do the best every day. I know I’ve tried my best every day when I’ve been out there, but some things don’t go the right way.”



Ross: Josh Johnson would bolster contender

Rumors fly around this time of year involving all sorts of players. But one that Red Sox outfielder Cody Ross is particularly intrigued by is his ex-teammate, right-hander Josh Johnson.

The Marlins have already made quite the splash this week, trading Anibal Sanchez and Hanley Ramirez. While they might be less inclined to move Johnson after already making two big trades, Ross knows that his former teammate could help any team he was traded to, including the Red Sox.

“I mean, he definitely would help any team,” Ross said. “He’s a bulldog. He’s one of the premier pitchers, an ace. I’ve always said that he is one of the most competitive players I’ve ever played with. He’s a bulldog.”

Ross and Johnson were teammates with the Marlins from 2006 until Ross was claimed off waivers by the Giants on Aug. 22, 2010. Though Johnson is just 6-7 with a 4.14 ERA this year, Ross is convinced his performance could improve down the stretch while pitching for higher stakes.

“Sometimes a change of scenery might help. He threw well his last time out,” Ross said. “He went through a little tough stretch but you can count on him being good down toward the end of the season. He’s as good as anybody out there.”

How about the change from a smaller market like Miami to a major market? Would Johnson be able to adapt to that change?

“Yeah, absolutely. He could definitely handle it. He’s so mentally strong that he wouldn’t let a big market affect him. He’s a professional. I can’t say enough good things about him. He’s special,” Ross said.

Johnson is under contract through the 2013 season, which would make him more attractive to a team like the Red Sox. That also could make the Marlins more inclined to hang on to him.