Results tagged ‘ Jose Iglesias ’

For Iglesias, shin problems started with Red Sox

It turns out Jose Iglesias was enduring more than people knew to start the 2013 season at shortstop with the Red Sox and to play third later in the season when Will Middlebrooks was demoted to Triple-A Pawtucket.

On Monday, Iglesias confirmed to Jason Beck of MLB.com and John Lowe of the Detroit Free Press that he has stress fractures in both shins. And he spoke about how much the ailment bothered him as early as last Spring Training.

“No idea. I just feel it from the very first moment of Spring Training [in 2013]. I just told myself to play through it, because I never expected something like that. I just feel pain, but Stephen Drew had a concussion at the time and that was an opportunity for me to start with the team. And I was like, ‘You know what, you’ve got to play through it.’ And I did it,” Iglesias said.

“We didn’t know what it was, but I played through it all year long. Last year I played through the pain all year long. Sometimes Farrell had to give me some days, the same as Jim Leyland here. He had to give me some days or take me out of the game because the pain was so bad. And I was like, ‘Man, I don’t know what to do to get rid of it.’ And I never found out until right now that it was a fracture.”

And in the ultimate irony, the injury for Iglesias could create a job opportunity in Detroit for Stephen Drew, who remains a free agent.

Peavy headed to Red Sox

The exhaustive search for a proven starting pitcher wound up a successful mission for the Red Sox as general manager Ben Cherington reeled in right-hander Jake Peavy from the White Sox in a three-team, seven-player deal late Tuesday night.

To pry Peavy away from the White Sox, the Red Sox also had to include the  Tigers. Jose Iglesias, who started at third base for Boston on Tuesday only to be removed in the ninth inning once the deal seemed probable, is headed to Detroit.

The trade was completed with a little time to spare before Wednesday’s 4 p.m. ET non-waiver trade deadline.

Trailing the Rays by a half-game in the American League East, Cherington hopes Peavy can aid the final push for Boston’s attempt at its first postseason berth since 2009.

“We’re really excited to bring Jake here,” said Cherington. “He’s obviously a proven Major League starter. He’s had a ton of success in his career. And I think if there’s one thing we wanted to do if we could pull it off is to add a starting pitcher. As we looked at the next two months, we’re in position to compete for a playoff spot and we just felt like adding a starting pitcher was probably the most important thing we could do to protect our chances to do that.”

Red Sox close to acquiring Peavy

The Red Sox are closing in on a deal for starting pitcher Jake Peavy, multiple sources have confirmed to MLB.com.

The deal has not been announced, but it likely will be once the Red Sox finish reviewing Peavy’s medical records. The non-waiver trade deadline is Wednesday at 4 p.m. ET.

Jon Heyman of CBSSports.com was the first to report the Red Sox and White Sox had agreed to a deal. WEEI.com reported that the Tigers are also involved in the trade, and they could be getting Jose Iglesias from Boston.

Peavy would give the Red Sox another proven arm in the rotation at a time Clay Buchholz remains out with a right bursa sac strain.

Buchholz last pitched for the Red Sox on June 8, and he is like three to four weeks from being activated.

The 32-year-old Peavy is 8-4 with a 4.28 ERA in 13 starts. He has made two starts since returning from the disabled list. Peavy had been sidelined with broken ribs.

The Red Sox would also control his contractual rights for next season, when he would earn $14.5 million.

In 12 Major League seasons, Peavy is 128-97 with a 3.49 ERA. He won the National League Cy Young Award with the Padres in 2007, going 19-6 with a 2.54 ERA.

Peavy has been with the White Sox since 2009.

The first inkling that a deal could be in the works happened in the top of the ninth inning in Tuesday night’s game at Fenway Park, when Boston manager John Farrell inserted Brandon Snyder at third base in place of Iglesias.

“Just to get Snyder on the field,” said Farrell. “I recognize the deadline tomorrow, there’s probably a lot of speculation that’s going on in every city. But that was the move.”

Snyder had just started on Monday, so it’s not like he needed the work.

Iglesias has been playing mainly third base for the Red Sox, but he’s a superb defender at shortstop.

The Tigers could soon see their starting shortstop Jhonny Peralta get suspended as part of the Biogenesis case that could impact several teams during the pennant race.

Iglesias got off to a hot start for the Red Sox at the plate this season, but has cooled off of late. He went 0-for-3 on Tuesday and is hitting .330 with one homer and 19 RBIs.

The Sox signed Iglesias out of Cuba in 2009. He has always been highly touted for his glove, and this year has proved his bat also has some life in it.

Xander Bogaerts, the top position player in Boston’s farm system, is a shortstop, perhaps making it easier for the Red Sox to put Iglesias in a trade.

Iglesias to start Home Opener

Jose Iglesias will get the thrill of playing in Monday’s home opener, as Stephen Drew will need an extra day at Double-A Portland thanks to a postponement on Saturday.

Drew, who sustained a concussion on March 7, will make his debut for the Red Sox on Wednesday.

“I think just talking with him late yesterday afternoon, he felt an additional eight to 10 at-bats would be helpful,” said Red Sox manager John Farrell. “He’s starting to feel much more comfortable but he felt like two additional games, to go nine innings each day, would put him in a better position to return to us.”

Meanwhile, Iglesias was back in the lineup on Sunday after missing Saturday’s game with a bruised right forearm.

“Yeah, and even yesterday, he was available yesterday but we had planned a down day for him, day game after the night game, just trying to balance guys’ not being accustomed to the turf here, which is the same reason Napoli is DH-ing today with Daniel at first. Jose is fully ready to go,” said Farrell.

Game 6 Grapefruit League: Red Sox 5, Rays 0

FORT MYERS, Fla. –- Daniel Bard and Alfredo Aceves both continue to look capable of holding down spots in the rotation. But the question lingers: Can the bullpen survive the loss of both of them?

What went right: Bard and Aceves both looked sharp while pitching three shutout innings against the Rays. Jose Iglesias executed a hit-and-run single in the first, moving Nick Punto to third. Iglesias also squared one up in his next at-bat and reached third when B.J. Upton misplayed his line drive to right-center.

What went wrong: Iglesias misread a sign and attempted a straight steal of home, only to be thrown out. Manager Bobby Valentine said after the game that it was supposed to a fake steal of home.

What they said: “I’m not a believer in the windup, period. I don’t get it. You throw your most important pitches of the game out of the stretch so you have to be more effective out of the stretch. Men are on base when you’re pitching out of the stretch so if that’s where you can throw your best pitches, why are you teaching yourself to throw twice, two different ways? It’s a crazy thought but I think if we were just starting the game right now, we wouldn’t teach anybody a windup.” – Bobby Valentine on his disdain for the windup.

What’s next: The Red Sox travel to Sarasota on Sunday to play the Orioles in a 1:05 p.m. ET contest. Jon Lester makes the start, and Aaron Cook will come out of the bullpen in his first appearance of camp. Cook is one of several candidates vying to be Boston’s fifth starter. Dustin Pedroia, Jacoby Ellsbury and David Ortiz will make the trip.

Injury update: Daisuke Matsuzaka continues to impress in his recovery from Tommy John Surgery. The righty threw a 40-pitch side session and should be on track for a return by midseason, if not sooner.

Chatting with Cherington

Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington took some time out of his busy schedule on Wednesday morning to talk with MLB.com about his first Spring Training in his new job. Here are some highlights from the interview.

After spending the winter building a team, what is Spring Training like? “Spring Training is the fun part, no doubt. It’s an opportunity to get back to what , I think, most of us got in the game in the first place, just to watch players play, watch the team play and see the collective work that’s been done when we get out on the field. You can start to see some things happening. Some good things, some not so good things. You react to the not so good things and try to react to them. Spring Training is a great time of year because it’s sort of the culmination of the offseason, which is typically a sort of frenetic pace. You get to now watch the game and that’s what we all want to do.”

What issues regarding the team keep you awake at night these days? “Well, the things that sort of stand out are the obvious ones. We need some guys to step up on our pitching staff. We’ve got a lot of guys here who are capable of doing that. We get to see them more. We’re optimistic because we believe we have guys that are capable of taking advantage of that opportunity. We have to see them do that. It’s march 7 – we haven’t seen enough of it yet. We’ve tried to build some depth in the outfield in the event that Carl wasn’t back at the beginning of the season and it looks like he may need a little more time. We’ll continue to look at that collection of outfielders and figure out works. As with every spring training, we’re going to cover every other team’s camp and see if there are guys available that might help us. I’d say that the primary focus is on trying to figure out who from that group of pitchers is going to step up and take advantage of the opportunity.”

What about shortstop? “We feel confident in what Aviles can do and the protection that Punto gives us. We think very highly of Iglesias and the player he’s going to be. He’s shown some good things already this spring and he’s making progress. I think I’ve said, there’s a competition. It doesn’t mean that competition is on equal footing. Some guys are going into the competition with an advantage but we’re not going to limit anyone. We’ll see how things evolve. Again, we’ll keep our eyes out but we feel confident that we have he answers here.”

How has life changed being the GM? “I guess I get recognized a little more but I don’t feel any differently, really. I’ve had the privilege of working here for a long time so I know … and growing up in new England, so  I know how passionate Red Sox fans are and that’s why this is such a great place to work and it’s such a great place to do our jobs. I’ve gotten recognized a little bit more but it’s nothing like what I saw from Theo all those years because I think the way that Theo came into the job and the success that he had – the sort of historic achievements put him on a level that no one else will or should. For me, I’m comfortable with that aspect of the job – people recognizing me more, but it doesn’t feel that different.”

Is it any different dealing with players in your new role? “I think one of the most important things I learned from Theo is that you can have a good relationship with a player and you can still make a hard decision. He did that I think as well as anybody. I’m a different person but I do think it’s possible and I think it’s important to have a good relationship with players but also to make it clear that that there are still decisions to be made and we have to make decisions that are in the best interest of the team. Some of those decisions, players won’t agree with but along the way, we can treat each other with respect and get along. Look, we’re all trying to achieve the same goal.”

Parting ways with Tim Wakefield and Jason Varitek? “That was one of the most challenging aspects of the offseason really, even though in the end, it didn’t translate into anything on the field this spring. Both those guys are guys that I have a great deal of personal respect for. Their accomplishments on the field speak for themselves and certainly the organization holds in really high regard. We made a decision that we weren’t prepared to guarantee them a job on the team  and based on that, we then had a long period of conversation about what that would mean and left the door open because we wanted to give them a chance to have a say in the outcome and the final decision. But it was hard, you have guys that have left that much on the field and given that much to the organization. There were times this offseason that I had to deliver news that they didn’t want to hear. We tried to do that in as respectful a way as possible. I also know that there will always be a place for Jason and Tim in the organization and we hope that we can work with both of those guys for a long, long time.”

From the outside looking in, you seem unflappable: “I don’t think I’m unflappable. I think I probably show my emotions a little bit less than some others. When things don’t go well, it bothers me as much as anyone else. I may internalize that more than some others.  I think that being a farm director for as long as I was was good preparation for this job in the sense that what you’re trying to do is create a system that works the best for as many people as possible. It’s not ever going to be perfect for everybody. Being a farm director helped me understand that the goal is to provide the best opportunity for as many people as possible and to help as many people as possible. Within that, there are going to be things that happen that you don’t like and people that are disappointed because players are human beings. I think in that sense it’s helped me a little bit.”

Tuning out public perception, particularly when it’s negative: “Some of it we don’t have a choice but to remove ourselves from it and just focus on finding solutions, finding answers. I understand, I have a great appreciation for the importance of the attention that the team gets, whether it’s positive or negative. We wouldn’t be the Boston Red Sox and this wouldn’t be such a great place to work if that attention wasn’t there. At different times, that attention can come in different forms. Last offseason we made some really big moves and felt reall good about our team and a lot of other people did too and it didn’t end the way we wanted it to. This year, our offseason was different, the way the season ened, the attention on the team was taking on a bit of a different flavor but I think if you take one step back, and sort of look at what’s actually on the field, in hindsight, there were some questions about last year’s team and there were questions about this year’s team and questions about 29 other teams in baseball. We’ve just got to do the best we can to get this team ready and look for solutions as we need them as the spring goes on, as the season goes on.”

Your first few months working with Bobby Valentine? “It’s been good. I’ve learned a lot from him. He sees the game about as well as anyone I’ve worked with. He sees the game differently then I do. We come from different backgrounds and I think that’s helped. I see some things differently that may help him sort of gain a new perspective. Hopefully the combination of different backgrounds can help us together make decisions. He’s got a ton of energy. He’s actually got – there’s a lot of things he has in common with tito. He lives and breathes and sleeps baseball. He wants nothing more than for players to perform well and for the team to win. He has a true passion for the game. He’s a baseball lifer in eveyr sense of the word. Their styles are different. There are certain things they’re going to do differently on the field and the way they go about things but ultimately there are a lot of core elements that are similar and the end goal is certainly the same. My job has been to get to know him and work with him and hopefully complement him as well as I can and develop that relationship so that when we get into the season and go through those inevitable tough times we both know we’re in a position to rely on each other and make the tough decisions if we need to.”

Biggest things you learned from Theo? “Well as I said, really, if I could point to one thing, it’s that sense of humanity that he showed in the way that he made decisions. You could make tough decisions and do it in a respectful, humanistic way. And that was the right thing to do, — it was the right thing to do sort of on moral grounds,  but it was also  the right thing to do on professional grounds. It helped give players the security of knowing that even when there was going to be a tough decision, when there was going to be bad news delivered, it was being done with as much respect as possible and it was being done in a way that helped the team and gave guys the best chance to win possible. If I had to point to one thing, I’d say that. There’s a lot of other things he taught me. Certainly I think he knows he knows as much about evaluating players as anyone in baseball. He’s got I think a very unique combination of feel for the objective side of player analysis and the subjective side. I don’t know too many people, if anyone, who are as good at sitting dfown and watching a game and seeing a player and evaluating them subjectively and also you can look at performance history and know exactly what he’s seeing there and being able to combine those two things. There are people that can do that. There are people that are good at one or the other . they’re may be people, but no one that I know as well that can do it like he does. So I learned a lot from him in those areas. I don’t think I match him in that respect. But I certainly learned a lot about how to balance those two things.”

Dan Duquette said the other day you always wanted to be a GM. Is that true? “I think when I first got the opportunity to work in baseball – first with the Indians and then with the Red Sox, Dan gave me an opportunity to scout, which is something I wanted to have the opportunity to do. I wanted to learn how to scout. I think I got into the game wanting to be a GM but also knowing that there’s a lot to learn and I was thrilled to have a chance to work in the game. As time went on, the goal of being the GM was still there. But really it evolved more into – what’s most important to me is not the title, it’s to be part of a group that’s doing something special and has a chance to put together and be part of a winning team, a winning organization. That’s what’s most important to me. When I was offered the job in Boston, I took it as much because I wanted to be part of something special and part of a winning organization as I did because of the tittle or because this was something I aspired to. Yeah, I had that goal in mine and I was lucky to … Dan gave me a chance to scout and learn and make some mistakes and learn from mistakes both in domestic scouting and Latin America. Then when Theo came aboard, I was given opportunities by him too. I’m very lucky to be given those opportunities and get the training and experience necessary to be able to do this job now.”

How excited are you to get to Opening Day, when you start getting measured every day by wins and losses? “It’s exciting. I think we’ll be facing Justin Verlander and it’s probably going to be about 40 degrees. I don’t know if that’s something you really look forward to. But it’s exciting because I think more than anything, I know the group of guys in the clubhouse are really ready to go be the Boston Red Sox again. Another thing that Theo taught me is that nobody should be judged by one moment. No team should be judged by one moment either. It should be judged by a longer time span, a longer period of peformance and behavior. I think the Boston Red Sox are much different than Septmeber of 2011 and I think our individual players are much different than what the perceptions of September of 2011 were. I think they are motivated to go show people that. So that’s what I’m looking forward to, more than anything else.”

Iglesias makes an opening splash

It was a moment Cuban defector Jose Iglesias had been thirsting for ever since the Red Sox signed him to a Major League contract last September. And then it finally happened in the bottom of the third inning of Wednesday night’s exhibition game against Boston College.

Marco Scutaro, Boston’s shortstop of the present, had just reached on an infield single. And Red Sox manager Terry Francona swiftly called on Iglesias, the team’s shortstop of the future, to pinch-run.

In what seemed like a blur, Iglesias whipped out of the dugout and relieved Scutaro. He was now playing for the Boston Red Sox, even if it was only an exhibition game. For Iglesias, who is just 20 years old, it was enough to have his heart racing with excitement.

“He looked like he was ready to play,” said Red Sox manager Terry Francona. “He wasn’t messing around. he was obviously very excited to play the game and he kind of came out in a hurry.”

And when Iglesias got his chance to hit, with the bases loaded in the bottom of the fourth, he jumped on the first pitch he saw, roping it into the corner in left for a three-run double.

“I was excited,” Iglesias said. “I hit the ball good and I was pumped. But once I got to second base, I had to concentrate on running the bases too because that’s important.”I was excited to play in my first Spring Training game and get my first Spring Training at-bat and I was just happy to swing the bat good.”

It was a whirlwind experience, but one Iglesias — pictured below by Brita Meng Outzen — will savor.
joseiglesias.JPG
“It’s like a dream playing here and playing in my first game in a Red Sox uniform,” said Iglesias. “I still have to work hard and do things every day to get better. That’s what I’m coming here to do every day.”

The Wave of the future

The next batch of Red Sox prospects is in town for the team’s annual Rookie Development program, a group that includes Casey Kelly, Jose Iglesias, Ryan Kalish, Junichi Tazawa and Luis Exposito.

We had some media availability in the bubbled practice facility at Boston College on Wednesday. Here are some snippets we gleaned.

Casey Kelly is now just a pitcher and happy about that. It makes training for the season a little more straightforward.

“It’s a lot easier than last year trying to train for two positions, but this year has been great. Knowing what position I’m going to be playing throughout the season has helped my training. Been training hard, started throwing program a couple of weeks ago. So I’m ready to get the season going,” Kelly said

Where is Kelly in his development?

“He’s going to compete for a spot in the Portland rotation. The criteria that we hold in terms of progressing players through the system, especially a starting pitcher, which is repeating your delivery, throwing your fastball to both sides of the plate and throwing your secondary pitches for strikes, Casey demonstrates a lot of those things already,” said director of player development Mike Hazen. “We feel pretty good that, if everything continues to progress, he could move pretty quickly. It wasn’t so much of a sell as a decision that we sat down and talked about. We didn’t feel like we had to sell him on this. We just felt like we needed to sit down at the end of the year and talk about what we felt like was going to be in the best interests of Casey moving forward, then hear what he had to say about what would be in the best interests of Casey moving forward, then putting it all together and coming to a joint decision. If Casey wouldn’t have bought into pitching, this wouldn’t work. It was very much how we hope all of our relationships with players is – it’s a partnership.”

Hazen had one very noteworthy quote on Exposito, the big catcher.

“He’s got tremendous raw power. He might have the best right-handed raw power in the system,” Hazen said.

As for Iglesias, he is learning the culture as much as he is trying to figure out what it takes to get to the highest level of baseball. He is working hard to learn English, even taking in American movies. His favorite thus far? “Avatar”.

There you have it.

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