Results tagged ‘ Mark Teixeira ’

Teixeira weighs in on Bobby V.

Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira is among those who think it’s good for the game and good for the rivalry that Bobby Valentine is about to be named the next manager of the Red Sox.

Speaking at an event in New York, Teixeira said, “I think it’s great. This rivalry is great for baseball, I’ve said it a million times. It’s great for both cities, but baseball as a whole, it seems like everyone stops just to watch those 18 games. Bobby Valentine is a great manager and he’s a funny guy. He’s got a great personality. I think the interviews either before or after games are going to be a little more interesting, and that’ll be good for both teams.”

But Teixeira thinks his relationship with Valentine will have to take a new twist.

“I was joking around on Twitter and Facebook, I don’t know if he’s going to let me hit at his facility anymore in Stamford. I’ve been hitting there for two years now at Bobby V’s academy and he’s there a lot. He’s a very busy guy obviously, but we’ll go and we’ll talk about hitting, we’ll talk about baseball. I don’t know if those conversations are going to be kept to a minimum now,” said Teixeira.

Still no word on when Valentine’s official unveiling will be, but Thursday seems logical.

A sign of a day gone bad

Outfielder Jonathan Van Every came on to pitch the ninth inning for the Red Sox on Saturday. In other words, the day went exactly as the Red Sox didn’t want it to. It was a fairly close game through six, as New York led 6-3. But the Yankees got two in the seventh and four in the eighth to make it a romp in motion.

On came Van Every for the ninth, and he served up a titanic home run to Mark Teixeira. It was the third homer of the day for Teixeira, who had just two on the season when the game started.

The last thing the Red Sox wanted to do this series is lose more ground to a division rival. But they’ve dropped two, and hoped to avoid a sweep Sunday night when Jon Lester takes the mound.

Baseball Armageddon — 2009 style

What a spectacular night at Fenway. The weather could not be better. First of 18 meetings between the Sox and the Yanks.

The reception for Mark Teixeira in his first at-bat was a little disappointing. They booed, but they did not give him the A-Rod treatment. I thought it would be far louder and more passion-filled. And after he made an out, the folks behind the third base dugout didn’t even react when he came back in.

Holy frustration for the Red Sox tonight. Four DPs against Chamberlain over the first five innings.

Anyway, chime in with your thoughts as the night develops

Look for Julio Lugo to start Monday night In Cleveland. Kotsay isn’t far behind. I wouldn’t be surprised if you saw him by the series at the new Yankee Stadium on May 4-5.

Rivalry back to 2003-2004 intensity

That’s right. The Red Sox-Yankees rivalry got a little tepid by its lofty standards from 2006-2008. Not anymore. We are back to peak intensity after the Yankees got Mark Teixeira yesterday for a cool $180 million over eight years. You know what? That’s fine.

All along, I couldn’t get into the whole Teixeira move mainly because I thought it was a terrible thing to do to Mike Lowell, one of the classiest and most professional Red Sox players I’ve ever come across.

So fine, the Red Sox made Teixeira a very fair offer — eight years at $168 million — and then walked away when the player said it wasn’t enough.

If Teixeira didn’t want to play for the Red Sox at fair market value, the Red Sox were right not to keep jacking up their offer until it was good enough.

Remember how done everyone felt when the Yankees swopped in and got A-Rod on Valentine’s Day in 2004? If memory serves me correctly, the Red Sox and not the Yankees won the World Series that year. Remember how worried everyone was when Brian Cashman stealthly swooped in and got Johnny Damon just like he got Teixeira on Tuesday? If memory serves me correctly, the Yankees haven’t won a playoff series in their three years with Johnny in the leadoff spot. Meanwhile, the Sox won it all in 2007 and came within a three-run homer of getting back to the World Series in ’08.

The Boston Red Sox have worked long and hard to put together a machine of an organization. Much like the Atlanta Braves of the 1990s, the Red Sox are stacked and don’t need to go out and make lavish offseason spendings to compete for championships.

So you have a nucleus that a lot of teams would love — Dustin Pedroia, David Ortiz, Kevin Youkilis, Lowell, Josh Beckett, Jon Lester, Dice-K, Jonathan Papelbon and others. You have Lars Anderson ticketed for 2012, once Lowell’s contract is up, and other young pitchers on the way, such as Clay Buchholz and Michael Bowden.

Last year didn’t feel as fun with the big competition coming from Tampa Bay instead of the Yankees. Now the Yankees truly are the evil empire again and it’s going to make the Red Sox that much more determined.

Why is everyone so surprised that the Yankees swooped in here? Since Theo has been GM, he’s the first to admit that the Yankees have won every bidding war. Yes, they won Contreras; Yes, they won A-Rod; Yes, they won Damon; And now they’ve won Teixeira. The Red Sox won Dice-K, but only because it was a highly unique situation in which they were able to win blind date rights and then beat Boras when he had no leverage.

Yet throughout all these bidding losses, the Red Sox have been the better team than the Yankees over the complete body of work since 2003.

Theo Epstein recently said from his hotel suite at the Winter Meetings in Las Vegas that the goal is not to “win the offseason”. The goal is to win April-September, and then hopefully October.

It can still happen. The fun will be watching it unfold. The only way the rivalry could have been any more fierce in ’09 is if the Yankees had gotten Manny. But his will more than suffice. I can’t wait to see that first Teixeira at-bat at Fenway. It will be the loudest jeers you’ve heard since Johnny Damon stepped up to the box at Fenway on May 1, 2006. Then, Mr. Teixeira will truly be welcomed to East Coast Baseball.

Happy Holidays to all readers.

Ian.

Looking Ahead

The World Series is over, and I think a lot of Red Sox fans are happy about this. Wasn’t it hard to watch that Fall Classic knowing that your team was so painfully close to being in there, and very well could have won it all?

Anyway, congratulations to the Phillies and to the Rays. They both had great seasons and should be extremely proud of what they accomplished.

I am still just blown away by the season that Brad Lidge had. There wasn’t one time all year he didn’t do his job. He converted every save opportunity from the beginning of April until the end of October. That is mighty impressive.

On to Red Sox matters. The end of the World Series means that we can start looking ahead to the winter, and what will soon be a simmering stove of player movement.

I’m not sure the Red Sox need to spend over $200 million on Mark Teixeira as great a hitter as he is. The Red Sox have a highly productive bat in Kevin Youkilis at first, and Mike Lowell — coming off hip surgery — at third. Let’s face it, because Lowell is rehabbing, you’re not going to be able to trade him. This is an uncommon injury so I don’t think many teams would take the risk. And if Lowell can get himself healthy, the Red Sox have a very productive bat in the middle of that lineup.

Pitching is always a place you can upgrade and there’s a lot to like in this year’s market. I’d start by making a furious run at Jake Peavy. This guy is a stopper, and pitching in an environment like Boston could get him to take his game to another level. The Red Sox have the chips to legitimately be in the race for a player like this, much like they were for Santana last year. And Theo Epstein and Padres GM Kevin Towers obviously have a great relationship.

I’m not big on Sabathia. He’s going to be overly expensive, so if I’m the Red Sox, I let the Yankees overspend on him.

Derek Lowe is an interesting one. We all know what he can do. We all know how much he thrives in Boston, especially in October. But what will the market be for the sinkerballer? Obviously he wants to come back  but it’s unclear how much the Red Sox would spend for a player in his mid 30s, albeit one who has been exceedingly durable throughout his career.

A.J. Burnett? I’d be a little leery there. He’s a tease. Sure, he finally had a great year and it was in a contract year. Not sure he could keep that up over the course of a long-term deal.

Catcher is the most intriguing part of this winter. It is hard to fathom that the Red Sox could be without Jason Varitek when pitchers and catchers report in February. As Kevin Youkilis said after Game 7,
“If I walk into Spring Training and don’t see Jason Varitek, it will be a day that will be very eye-opening and very sad.”

I’m with Youk on this one. I know Varitek was beyond terrible offensively this season. Could it be, however, that it was nothing more than a player putting too much pressure on himself in a contract year, not to mention the fact that he was going through a divorce? The guy is human. Both these things could have played an impact. If I’m the Red Sox, I try real hard to get Varitek signed for two years and hope that it’s enough. There’s just not a lot of catching out there.

I think the Boston offense doesn’t need a big shakeup. If you get Lowell healthy and David Ortiz close to back to what he was, those are two big additions to your lineup right there. Jacoby Ellsbury will probably get better and so, too, could Jed Lowrie.

What would all of you like to happen this offseason?

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